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to learn that two provinces have developed regulations. i heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk about what he had learned as a mayor. he had been a central government official before and he realized once you got there, a central government officials do not understand a lives of ordinary people. and then he had to watch the proceedings and the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice. that was one of the first times in 35 or 40 years of going to china that i heard a chinese talk about procedural justice. the term is in the vocabulary. i think local experimentation may have the least helped in the increment the building of the change of legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of one of the american federal systems. the laboratories of the experiment. one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion, it is a large population. one virtue is that you can divide it into provinces and you can have real experiments. try this over here and try that over there. that is a tremendous v
. >> in the caesarian title, schilling has devastated large parts of the city, including a large suburbs. the rebels say they have also made gains in eastern syria. fighters say they have captured this oil field. tens of thousands of mainly sunni iraqis turned out to protest the government. they are accusing maliki of marginalizing sunni leaders. >> a sea of people gathering in the provincial capital. and there is mounting a, and mistrust of the government is -- anger is mounting, and protest of the government is deep. they have been protesting a week and are not going anywhere. >> our enemy once this gathering to be dispersed. this injustice is not only happening on the sunni, but our shia brothers as well. >> among the demands is an end to perceived discrimination. >> this government is targeting sunnis on purpose. they fear no god, and we do not trust them. >> these protesters are very angry. they are raising their demands every day. they are now calling to topple the government of newry maliki. they want the government to release the prisoners and to end the injustice in this country. they are also
and that cities are key to the economy. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, we've had high-profile examples of public-private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. one reason we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money, but to provide oversight, you have somebody to go to when you have a project, a regulator. an interlocutor. we should alloy private money. there's an additional problem. about so-called eminent domain. you can't just clear things out in china they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving. we're building a road here. you got to move out of your apartment tomorrow. we can't do that. it makes it trickier in our older cities to rebuild in the way they did in china. >> it's an interesting analo
you some of the figures. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. now, we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, but we've had some high-profile examples of public/private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. and by the way, one reason when he we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money but just to provide oversight and ombudsman so that you have somebody to go to when off project or regulator, an interlocutor perhaps. we should definitely allow private money. there is an additional problem, and richard probably knows more about this, about so-called eminent domain, where you can't just clear things out. in china, they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving, we're building here a road here. you have to move out of your parm tomorrow.
need all the help you can get. our treatments are so complex. if somebody's living in a large city, and they want to go to a specialized medical center such as ours, they may have to travel twenty or thirty miles. well, you can't go back and forth if you've had a chemotherapy treatment on your own. somebody has to take you. so the family is critical. cindy: i hated chemo. it hurt me. it made me sick. i really was not thrilled with my oncologist, and i just remember saying one day, "i'm just not going to go. nobody can make me go. i don't like this," and through a series of misadventures, my little sister, who i think is the only person on the planet who's tougher than i am, showed up at my doorstep, and said, "we are going to chemo now." and basically hauled me by the scruff of my neck down there. and it was an incredibly great thing for her to have done. dr. ganz: patients need someone... who they can share their fears and their concerns with. and they often do this with a close friend, or a family member, and often that person becomes a real kind of sounding board for testing out
proxies for medallions. they are required to operate cabs in many large cities including new york. the meters run higher than most other asset classes for decades. >> i don't think we ever thought it would hit a million dollar price. they have gone up 15% per year for 70 years. outperforming the dow, gold, nasdaq and real estate. >> his grandfather bought one of the badges for 10 bucks. 10,000% return since 1937. look at stock when you reinvest dividends, leaving s&p 500 behind in its rear view mirror. david: what do one cost? >> million bucks for the corporate guys. one million bucks or 700,000 for an individual. david: thanks, robert [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind aumatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi
medallions are required to operate cabs in many large cities including new york. they were first issued in the big apple during the great depression. >> back in 1937, this little piece of tin sold for $10 each. >> his grandfather bought one of the first badges and medallion financial was born. the company has seen quite a return on that first investment and on hundreds more medallions it bought since then. back in the late '70s when the checker cabs were cruising the streets of new york city, a taxi medallion would set you back less than $100,000. now this piece of metal on the front of your cab will set you back more than a million bugs. >> i don't think we ever thought it would hit a million dollar price. they have gone up 15% per year, 70 years. outperforming dow, gold, nasdaq, real estate. you name it. >> analysts marvel at the company's track record. unlike most banks, medal i don't know never had default on taxi loan. >> real estate lending someone defaults it is years before banks get money back. it is terrific collateral. the medallion is the little tin. if somebody doesn't pay
. in westchester county two large cities, yonkers and vernon. [talking over each other] >> of those 80% of people with legal handguns were they in tending and plotting who they were going to attack or were they on the street? what was the climate? >> various array of different crimes but now what we have is crimes tend >> with technology. stuart: i will break in for a second. i want to give you breaking news from the environmental protection agency. the administrator lisa jackson says she will step down. she has been on the job four years. she announced her departure in a statement that came out today. no particular reason for leaving but she says she was ready for new challenges, time with a family and opportunity to make a difference. lisa jackson, administrator of the epa will step down. back to you for a second, peter. we have a list published in the newspaper. everyone who knows where the legal handguns are in each house, name and address of the person who has got them. in newton, conn. we had a dreadful case of legally hunt handguns used to the terrible way by someone who was clearly mental
for being had largely disappeared. if you think about every one of america's older, colder cities, they were all part of solving a transportation problem. they were all nodes on a transportation network. if you go back to 1816, we as americans sat on the edge of an enormously wealthy continent that was virtually inaccessible. in 1816 it cost as much to move goods 30 miles over land as it did to ship them across the entire atlantic ocean. it was so expensive to get goods in. over the course of the 19th century, we've built an amazing network. we built canals like the erie and illinois and michigan canals, railroads atticaals, and cities grew up. at buffalo, the western terminus of the erie canal. the oldest cities were typically where the river meets the sea, like boston and new york, but every one of america's 20 largest cities was on a major waterway. chicago was a future that was made it the linchpin of a watery arc that went from new york to new orleans. and industries grew up around these transportation hubs. chicago's most famous is, of course, its stockyards, and that's what you're loo
, everyone. >> reporter: in september, new york became the first u.s. city to restrict sales of large-sized sodas and other sugary drinks. restaurants, fast food chains and movie theaters will only be allowed to serve cups that old 470 milliliters or less. that's a third of the largest cups now available. the deciding factor was the city's ballooning medical costs. in new york city alone obesity-related medical costs come to over $3.8 billion a year. if obesity rates continue to rise, the financial burden will be crippling. >> this is the single biggest step any city has ever taken to curb obesity. it is not the last step that lot of cities are going to take. we believe that it will help save lives. >> reporter: the beverage industry is fiercely opposed to the ban. workers have been holding protest outside new york city hall. >> they should really take a stand and make sure they're getting exercise and not just trying to cut the size of the drink. >> reporter: they have launched an all-out war against the city claiming the ban is invalid. many movie theaters the are also voicing their
covers the 9.4 irrigated acres that comprise over four city blocks of that large and iconic park. the alamo square project that we propose, this mou would cover anyway would cover this need within the park. the current system there we have a leaking irrigation system that is over 30 years old. more stunningingly we have a corroded coupler line, over 70 years old which far exceeds life cycle of that time. we have low water pressure in the park, which impacts our water distribution in the existing irrigation system. we have an inefficient irrigation system design and layout difficult to maintain lawn and steep slopes and underutilized areas. this is the actual need we have. in june of this year we were awarded by the puc the -- a grant in the amount of 1,318,485 to undertake this project, which requires the mou before you today. that particular project we have proposed would address these particular items. it would replace irrigation system. replace that completely quick cover line, install a booster pump to increase water pressure, improve irrigation system layout and design, repl
you, judge. >> new studies shows stall construction projects are on the rise in america's large of the city. according to a new report from builders there are hundreds of vacant lots and half finished projects around new york city despite all of them having the necessary permits for construction. now the news from brooklyn. that is this about? >>guest: well, there are e monuments in a bad economy. a finish which is one of several hundrednd at the city like that where the construction just stops. the workers are one day and suddenly they never show up again and they are e and quiet for years. this is a legacy of the 2008 financial crisis having to do with long-term institutional borrowing and lending and that is a problem. look at the numbers: 691 inactive sites up 17 percent in new york city since february. 45 percent dormant since 1999. it is run out of money or a combination of running out or fought having enough sales or the market for rentals does not appear to be strong enough to justify completion. >>guest: the american institute of architects are putting together develope
relationships with city governments to the point where there is a large regulatory regime in most cities around taxis. in many cases you have regulators who feel their job is to protect the taxi industry. i had one regulator in new york refer to the taxi industry as their customer. so what happens then is that once it goes into that protection mode, innovation becomes very difficult. it may be why in so many cities that innovation around taxi around transportation is so gummed up. the rig heaters who are supposed to crack the whip end up becoming the protectors. even though it's hard, uber is completely legal, in the cities that we're rolling out and there are cities that we can't roll out where we're like miami and vegas we can't roll out. there is that protection mechanism that makes it particularly controversial. >> so you say you're legal but a lot of these cities suggest otherwise. their regulators are sending out crease and desist orders almost on a daily base. impounding cars in washington, d.c. at one point. they're not allowing this technology to take shape. these guys are starting to
developed regulations. i heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk about what he had learned as a mayor. he had been a central government official before and he realized once you got there, a central government officials do not understand a lives of ordinary people. and then he had to watch the proceedings and the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice. that was one of the first times in 35 or 40 years of going to china that i heard a chinese talk about procedural justice. the term is in the vocabulary. i think local experimentation may have the least helped in the increment the building of the change of legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of one of the american federal systems. the laboratories of the experiment. one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion, it is a large population. one virtue is that you can divided into provinces and you can have real experiments. try this over here and try that over there. that is a tremendous virtue. i read in your book, you h
will be doing great. the coastal cities, again, largely rain and travel delays will be impacted significantly where we have new york, philly and d.c. >> sounds like retailers can't catch a brick right now. superstorm system and now the storm is barreling its way across the country and with holiday pale at their weakest, heard that this morning, do retailers, can they make up for last yund. >> thank you. have, why don't you go first. what impact is it going to have? >> you have declining dispose al income and petter problems. you have the retailers that have inconspicuous stock and consumers are concerned about everything from hurricane sandy and the senseless slaughters in sandy hook, connecticut, spending less and giving more to charities. >> jan, i don't want to minimize any of this, the damage that this storm has already inflicted in parts of the country and could still inflict, but we were in an environment where people were just not shopping to begin with. do you think retailers could use this as a good excuse going forward? >> yeah, bert's here with me the four horsemen and apocalypse.
guns in their homes. and you can figure out when may not. it is a local new york city wit large circulation, they are saying that the gun control and the happening of newtown, connecticut are in the minds of this readers. so they published a map of where all handgun owners live. on the journal news website, all you have to do is zoom into a neighborhood and the locations of any gun permit holders will show up with red dots tap a dot, and the name and address of the permit holder pop up. the newspaper got the data by filing freedom of information requests with the clerks of the county. they do not indicate whether the residents own the guns just that they are legally able to. and homes are shot guns and rifles are not included because in those counties those can be bought but permits. but the news has brought backlash. the same complaint was made by some readers. i think aforesait was an irresp thing for them the to do. it's saying to robbers go to the home next door, they do not have a gun. or thieves that want to steal the guns will know where to get them. at this store, i spok
have adopted the regulations, namely -- and i went there and heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk at what he had learned as a mayor. he'd been a central government official before he was posted down and he realized once he got there, the central government officials don't really understand the lives of ordinary people. and then he began to watch the proceedings, the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation, and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice that was one of the first times in 35, 40 years of going to china at her to chinese talk about procedural justice. i think that the term is in the vocabulary, and i think that local experimentation may at least help in the incremental building of a changed legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of the american federal system, is called the brandeis, called the laboratories of experiment. now, one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion is it a very big population. it's hard to govern. at one virtue of is you can divide into parts and provinces, and you rea
of debris from drainage pipe that carry storm water to the lower level of the city. trying to prevent a large back that up could unleash a torrent of potentially destructive water. >> more than anything we have seen in the last 15 years. saturation levels in the hillside creating a lot of flow throughout the lower levels. >>reporter: nearby there has been a nagging flow of water through frank hererra sky light into the kitchen. >> call the contractor hope to get him over here next day to see what he has to say and hopefully they can order up a new part. the tarp is coming. before the next storm definitely. >>reporter: only kern boulevard they scrape out junk and the metal great id that goes that the station. >> gets full of grass and clean it tout make sure the pump able to run. >>reporter: the pump take all the run off from city streets and flush it into the bay. willow tree topple on hillside on valley view avenue. wasn't particularly big but the branches may have created a natural dam lead ing into a drain pipe. >> always looks better than a fallen down tree. they just recent
taking over a large percentage of our city. a lot of it was non for profits. i have had a good working relationship with people in the state governments. it is good to have them close. i can see what they're doing and to buy and put and see what i can do for the people of the city. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: we turn our attention to unemployment insurance and how it can be impacted. joining us for the discussion is josh . caller: it is a combination of a federal and state program. it usually lasts -- it can be extended up to 93 weeks. it is the extension be on the six month time frame we're talking about as part of the fiscal cliff tops. host: that is what might be caught -- cut? guest: that is what automatically expires. president obama has said as part of the deal i want to make, the benefits should continue. republicans have not taken a firm stand. we have seen in the past obama has had to make a deal on taxes. host: what specific benefits do these programs provide? guest: usually some kind o
army is trying to organize the tent city, but they lack the money, experience, and personnel to take care of such a large group of people. >> from morning at 7:00 evening, this is for five people, for a family. >> he is living with his family of 17 in an old tent. >> the rain was terrible. everything -- really everything got wet. even our mattresses. hopefully, my children will not get sick, too. >> basil is trying to provide the children at the camp with education, teaching them how to read, write, and drop. the children's drawings illustrate the impact of the war on their lives and the months many have spent in the camp. >> this is the helicopter of b ashar al assad. until a few months ago, about 5000 people live here. now there are four times that number. the refugees are glad to have a roof over their heads. osama hassan from aleppo spent months in a tent. >> i just wanted to get over the border. a turkish border soldiers shot me in the leg without warning. they are not letting anyone through any more. >> it is hard for the syrian air force because of its proximity to the border.
joins us in new york city. so what is going on here, jamie? >> reporter: there are large concerns and it is pretty serious why we're talking about it again. martha, it has been already five days and there is no sign of this 11-year-old cancer patient known only as emily but authorities haven't given up hope. they have actually expanded their search and making clear that time is not on their side. take a look at this. this is a snippet of surveillance video they're working with, showing emily inside the phoenix children's hospital where she has been treated for lukemia a day before her scheduled discharge. you see her without a wig and iv pole. her mom puts her in different clothes and disguise that allowed her to go undedected outside the hospital as police are describes an as black van. a alert nurse quickly contacted 911. the catheter in emily's heart, doctors say, if it becomes infected could have deadly consequences. the little girl had one arm amputated from a previous infection. >> i can tell you we have searched for these, location of these individuals, both locally and out
and advised all manners of clients in the real world of new york city. businesses, large and small, and individuals. as a true generalist, she has tried a wide variety of cases and her professional accomplishments and accolades are numerous, including serving as head of the litigation section, the largest section of the american bar association. she was, in fact, a pioneer in this position as the first asian-american to hold this prestigious post. second, on the point of moderation. when i mess miss schofield, i was struck -- met miss schofield, i was struck by the fact that she has one singular agenda -- the preservation of the rule of law. indeed, her professional work has been devoted to the general improvement of the practice of law and to zealously representing her clients in the best and most ethical traditions of the profession. evidence of her moderation can be found in the support she has across the political spectrum. both democrats and republicans have called notice tell me what a great -- me to tell me what a great judge she'll make. she's done everything from teaching
is in the community development block grant. that is a block grant that cities use largely. it is very flexible. they can use it to help in their recovery efforts in the most flexible way possible host: new mexico has two air force bases, two national research allowance, and many folks are dependent on federal money for work and assistance programs. for her. -- it will hurt. , democratic caller. caller: explain the logic behind what taxing one of our biggest corporations, which is the religious work -- religious churches and all of that that make $10 trillion a year. and also, how come medicare pays for -- i think it is $1 billion now -- a formula enhancement drugs. that is a pleasure, not a need. -- for male enhancement drugs. that is a pleasure, not a need. host: independent caller, go ahead. caller: i would like to bring up the point that you have brought of the federal portion of the moneys and the money does not go -- come out of nowhere. that is the tax dollars, or has been borrowed, were printed. that money is not without cost. i would like to have your opinion on that. thet: you're refe
foot high tsunami but no large wave paps tower camera in tokyo captured the entire city shaking there. there are reports of a few injuries but no major damage at this point. a tsunami warning has been lifted. some roads were closed and rail service temporary stopped for safety checks. >>> oakland police swat team surrounded an apartment complex late last night. warrants were being served. we have no other details right now but that swat activity ended about 2:00 this morning. no word of any arrests were made. >>> two san jose restaurants have a lot of cleaning up to do after a fire forced them to evacuate just before closing time last night. ktvu janine de la vega is in san jose to tell us if the restaurants are expected to be open today. >> reporter: firefighters told us they think the restaurants should be able to open but they are unsure just how much water damage is in there from them extinguishing the fire. these restaurants are in a strip mall in the evergreen area just before 9:30 last night. people inside started noticing smoke inside. both restaurants were evacuated and firef
. groups trading at 7.7 times earnings, historically trade at ten times, winding down of citi's holdings a benefit to the stock. it's the cheapest in the large cap universe on price to book basis absent bank of america, trading 8% of price to book. i think this is what you want to go into, things with definable catalysts, and when you have a stock rally, the financials participate in the history of markets. it's one you want to hold on. energy side, clearly, energy is not growing in terms of the demand in the u.s.. where it's growing is the rest of the world. >> right. >> we don't have any real opec or non-opec growth in terms of plux. who gets the call? the people who do offshore and deepwater drilling and down hole work. that's why you want to be there. >> global diversions here to some extent. all right, thank you very much, gentlemen, john stevenson and larry, have a great weekend. >> thank you, you too. >> thanks. >> leaders meeting with the president right now this very moment at the white house and the country and entire world watching because if we go off the cliff, markets aroun
, obviously there are pros and cons. we miss living near new york city. obviously we had a severe crisis, which i hope we don't. i'm not sure that large population centers where somebody would want to be. obviously it would be unthinkable should happen. it's not why we moved, if there were a really bad attack of one type of another, we don't live in a concentrated area. there are advantages. >> we have been talking with thomas woods junior. the most recent book "rollback: repealing big government before the coming fiscal collapse." this is booktv on c-span2 on locations in las vegas. >>> booktv on facebook. like us to interact with booktv guests and viewers. watch viewers, get up-to-date information facebook.com/booktv. booktv sat down with philip auerswald to discuss his book "the coming prosperity: how entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy." he was in atense for the fall for the book festival held annually at the university. it's about a half an hour. >>> now joining us here at george maison university is professor philip auerswald. the most recent book is "the coming prosp
seen a dramatic drop in litter 0 around the city. san jose officials say their next goal is to eliminate polystyrene foam. they plan to present the city warmest to the city council in february to phase out foam boxes for large established starting in 2014 and small restaurants in 2015. >> the specific gun club may not be evicted after all the board of supervisors are expected to vote on the matter tomorrow. the city voted to of the to the club back in july after the estimated soil cleanup costs of the site would be $10.5 million. but during the eviction process, the club reached a deal for a month- to-month lease with the city. the gun club has been at this location for nearly 80 years. >> members of nasa's curiosity team are expected to give an update of its mission to mars today at noon. --the announcement will be delivered here in san francisco at the annual fall meeting of the american geophysical union. rumors about a big discovery began after curiosity's sciences was quoted as saying that a rover instrument responsible for finding inorganic compounds had gathered da
groundbreaking series coming sandman -- [cheers and applause] collected a large number of u.s. awards in its 75 issue run. i was a city hall and a young woman said to have every single one of those. including nine will eisner comic industry were simply heard heard the words. in 1991, the first comic i virtue received literary award for best short stories. he's also won the coveted two. a word. mr. gaiman is credited with being a creator of modern comics as well as some out there who's worked and reached audiences of all ages. he is listed in the dictionary of literary biography as a top 10 living postmodern writers and is a prolific writer of prose, poetry, film, journalism, comics, song lyrics and drama. it is a, please welcome me and give anyone fairfax and george mason welcome to mr. neil gaiman. [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] >> there are an awful lot of view. [laughter] hello. right, so the plan for this evening. there is one. although i only decided what it was about four minutes ago. so there is a plan. the plan is as follows. i couldn't decide whether
economy is putting more large trucks on the road or maybe because of all the bike lanes in new york city and people are angry and trying to hit them. can't confirm that. >>> triple a reports the average annual price of gas this year will almost certainly top last year's record. well, despite that, prices are falling now and in a big way. the lund berg survey shows the average cost of a gallon of regular unleaded is down 10 cents over the past three weeks and i continuing down. what's causing this, rich? >> reporter: americans are driving less. that and slowing economic growth mean the world is using less oil. after problems earlier this year, refineries are pumping out more gas. also, warmer than average temperatures meaning americans are using less oil to heat their homes. all that pushes prices down further. prices also spiked after hurricane sandy and have fallen since, shepard. >> shepard: so right now they're headed down more, right? > >> reporter: that's right. there's a difference between lowest and highest of 80 cents a gallon. 3.85 in long island, in mems me, tennessee, it's les
in the city of budapest. the attack on hon. jews happen later in the war. effectively, -- the attack on hungarian jews happen later in the war. a large community survive in budapest, a couple hundred thousand, which is a significant number. in poland they survive in all kinds of ways. many survive are going to the soviet union. many came home to find what was left. one very sad and moving archival document said many come home just to see the cemeteries and then leave because they do not want to be there anymore. jews to come back. some try to make new lives there. some joined the communist party. the communist party has an attraction not just for jews, but for anybody who experience the devastation of the war and the shattering of morality the war brought. many people did see in communism a kind of alternatives. maybe this system will work. liberal democracy did not work. the west did not come to our aid. maybe there is some alternative. there was a brief time when people were listening to the radio station, and it was attractive for jews who had nothing else that were excluded from
: rising sea levels. today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg announced a new long-term initiative to protect the city from future natural disasters. he called for rebuilding vulnerable coastal areas, but dismissed again the idea of constructing a large sea-gate across the harbor. >> we're not going to abandon the waterfront. we're not going to abandon the rockaways or coney island or staten island's south shore. but we can't just rebuild what was there and hope for the best. we have to build smarter and stronger and more sustainably. >> woodruff: 350 miles south. the city of norfolk, virginia, is another coastal city vulnerable to sea level rise and extreme storms. but its mayor has said parts of his city might not be livable in the future. our producer, mike melia, traveled to norfolk recently to look at how it has been struggling with flooding and preparing for the next big storm. he worked with member station whro to bring us this report. it's part of our series-- working with public media partners across the country-- that we call "battleground dispatches." >> reporter: when r
. they were all part of this mosaic that came to be, this political machine. but by and large, it was run by these two guys, an irishman and a connecticut yankee. it's the history of the the city that's in the subtitle; fearless ethnics, political wizards, underrated scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. and, but it's a different town now. it's, i mean, it's no long orer just albany. albany, it's about five or six towns all put together. it's troy, it's schenectady, it's colony, it's saratoga. saratoga's only half an hour away. and these are great places to live and to see, and there's a lot to see in this town. town is coming back. it's also a great, a beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town. and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have that reputation anymore that stanford white thought it had. >>
began. and a large community. a significant figure at that time given the population of the city. in poland this survive in all kinds of ways. many people survived by going to the soviet union command many people come home to find what is left to see what kind of live they made. one very bad and moving document can last many come home just to see the cemeteries and leave because they don't wanta be there anymore. but they come back. some try and make new lives there. some join the communist parties. the communist party as an attraction for -- a buddy who has experienced the devastation of the war, the shattering of all ethics and all morales lehigh, many people did see in communism a kind of alternative. there was a time, a very brief time when some people so they come back. and some really camino, it's a strange and cards started tell because sums on the communist party and some immediately come into conflict with the communist party because a lot of them are small traders are merchants.the. they then begin to be large groups. help train qc will fight for independence and palest
on things. he loved being provocative. he largely created the new york city we now know, certainly the point of view. it inspired me because i have always looked up to people who sea change taking place and look at that as an opportunity instead of a threat. a couple of years before he died, i went to see him. he died about five years ago. he was at berkeley and at the time in his late 70's. he was running the graduates' magazine program at uc. he had serious cancer. it was very hard to understand him. he was still so excited about the student projects. he spent the entire morning taking me through these magazines his graduate students had created. he was an optimist and passionate about his work right to the end. it was also very instructive to recognize it is not work if you love what you do. >> let me follow-up on that. you have spoken about how you have never taken the easy path. you are drawn to where the heat is. that takes a tremendous amount of courage. why are you drawn to that? >> i do not know the answer completely except that i grew up as the oldest daughter and oldest granddaugh
kids by and large are clueless about this. it is not just language thing. these kids know more about the middle east and china. in speaking to the average high- school in new york city and after it's about what is happening in the world, i think it would take your breath away. this is a serious problem. the second part of what the technology can matter is because we did not have to limit the school day anymore to the hours inside the school room. as -- there is much more we can do. i watch people here from a great school in sweden. and they have managed to create a portal in ways. i met a kid whose mother was an aris -- was a nurse. we are the only profession that admits we are failing in what we're doing for our kids and we all go home at 3:00. there has to be a way to think differently about the dimensions of the challenge. i think technology is part of that problem. about to go back to what condie started. as important as music and art and global history is, to two cannot read into basic mathematics -- kids who cannot read or do basic mathematics will not do higher or critical thi
the north bay and oakland, hayward, redwood city, the san mateo coast and by 10:00, the eastern and southern portions of the bay. by midnight, it will be largely self of the golden gate. it will be diving down to the south with reveron showers and 54 clock. by the time we head out tomorrow is going to be dry. we will also see the clouds decreasing. here is what we can accep expect-rainfall totals will be less than one-half inch but nearly 1 in. near the coast. local snow levels are going to fall but when that happens there is the possibility of a light dusting in the north bay hills. as for the sierras, some snowfall and early tomorrow. lingering flurries and mostly sunny conditions by monday. they look at your extended forecast. dry saturday and also drier on sunday with the chances of showers in the north bay. dry on tuesday with another chance for the entire-bay area on wednesday. >> catherine: the bay area's favorite way to ring in the new year. is always with kron 4. parties - and of course fireworks. i'll be hosting along with gary radnich. kron 4's new year's live. starts at 11-30 on
known, particularly in the city of budapest. the attack on hon. jews happen later in the war. effectively, -- the attack on hungarian jews happen later in the war. a large community survive in budapest, a couple hundred , which is a significant number. in poland they survive in all kinds of ways. many survive are going to the soviet union. many came home to find what was left. one very sad and moving archival document said many come home just to see the cemeteries and then leave because they do not want to be there anymore. jews to come back. some try to make new lives there. some joined the communist party. the communist party has an attraction not just for jews, but for anybody who experience the devastation of the war and the shattering of morality the war brought. many people did see in communism a kind of alternatives. maybe this system will work. liberal democracy did not work. the west did not come to our aid. maybe there is some alternative. there was a brief time when people were listening to the radio station, and it was attractive for jews who had nothing else that
. she is still at large. deadly subway pushing in less than a month in new york city. there is no deal yet for the fiscal cliff. but for now we have at least avoided the container cliff. 15,000 dock workers at 15 major u.s. ports and port owners agreeing to extend an expired contract for 30 days. the main issue is container royalties. the heavier the container the more dock workers get paid. owners want to cap payments. a strike would have meant higher prices on many goods like clothing, auto goods and electronic products because they would have been in short supply. emma lou harris could be in trouble with the law. tmz reports that harris is accused of hitting another car on a highway then driving off. the l.a. county d.a. is deciding whether harris will face any charges. in one was hurt. a rep for the singer says it was so minor harris didn't even know she hit the other car. and those are your headlines. >> thank you, juliet. let's talk about this story because this is outrageous. >> dave: unbelievable. >> juliet: sick. >> clayton: here is what vladimir putin did in response to the u
't right you know? in other words, we've earned the right by and large g.e.'s relationship in china is good. we've been a good investor for a long time. we've taken a lot of heat here in new york city and washington, d.c. because we've stood tall as good, honest partner with the chinese. but what's also incumbent on you is when you've earned that position occasionally you have to speak up. and i did. >> rose: as you know, when you speak up about china people also say "look at general electric, this great american company. they're exporting jobs as well." >> we have jobs all over the world, right? so we are the second-biggest exporter behind boeing. we're a net exporter in every other country in the world. but we will sell more gas turbines -- we have a 50% market share of the large gas turbine market. we will sell more in algeria in the next three years than the united states. so what are we supposed to do? are we supposed to sit here and just say, oh, it's too hard? >> rose: and if you don't get the business somebody else will. >> somebody else is going to get it. we're down to the point a
the battle that is on. they are better equipped, they have taken large parts of the northern part of the country, and they are also beginning to tighten around a lot of the central syrian cities, including damascus and trying to go all the way in videotapes, they said that they were going to go to bashar al-assad's house. the russians are changing their tune a little bit. the russians only foreign enable poor. one of the reasons they have been so locked up with they are thinking they want to keep their port. the russians are not the only one involved. lots of people sending weapons into syria. you have a war going on with the wrong, on the other side, you have weapons coming from saudi arabia and qatar in turkey and that is what is supplying the rebels in the civil war that is continuing to rage on. both of those don't really have a lot to gain. they have a lot to lose. their side loses, they will lose a lot. as long as the syrians are willing to keep killing each other in this process, so far the syrian civil war has now claimed 44,000 lives. many people believe there really no m
festivals' columbus, ohio they used the money to buy an underwater machinery. host: and in the kansas city, they purchased in bomb detection -- a bomb detection robots despite already having two. it sat largely unused and was brought back on line are high schoolers. let's go to our first caller. from the breezy and appeared -- from louisiana. caller: the u.s. territories, do they applied to them guest: they apply to all of federated territories as well. in some areas, there are statutory minimum amounts that have to be provided to those territories. host: if you like to join the conversation and talked to david maurer about a homeland security grants to states, here are the numbers to call. what formula did the grant programs follow went looking to get out the money? what do they have to do? guest: it varies from program to program, but generally speaking, as a first cut, dhs takes into consideration the risk. in other words, it wants to provide the money more toward portions of the country where there is a greater risk of attack or natural disaster. secondly, we look at capabilities. how
governments both large and small, the state of new york city dwovet -- government and so many others that are waiting to see if they will get some relief sew they can move tor ward with their plans. we beat back host of the crippling amendments. we beat back all of the crippling amendments an most of the amendments -- and most of the amendments. it's a very, very trying day, i think, for the senate. the century old tradition of different parts of the country rallying to help those that are beleaguered because of the difficult natural disasters continuing and the fact that 12 republicans voted for a bill that contain virtually no offsets except for the one amendment that passed last week. that is a full bill, a whole bill, a bill that gets new york and new jersey rapidly on the road to recovery fills us with hope that we can get something done and get something done quickly. when we press, when we explain to our colleagues what we needed and the desperation in here, they listened carefully. and we're really very, very glad about that. let me say a few specific things. there is very am
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